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The Economy

The Labor Market in the Post-Pandemic Era

According to the most recent Future of Jobs Report by the World Economic Forum, 50% of employees will need new skills training by 2025 as the pace of technological innovation continues to grow. Among business leaders, 94% say they expect employees to learn new skills while on the job, compared to just 65% who made that claim in 2018.1

However, the amount of time it takes to reskill will depend on the industry, according to the online learning platform Coursera. For example, only one or two months is necessary to acquire skills in emerging professions such as content writing, sales and marketing; in contrast, it could take up to three months to expand skills in product development, data and artificial intelligence. Skills needed for roles in cloud computing and engineering could take up to four months. Among soft skills that will increase in demand, critical thinking and problem-solving top the list. But post-pandemic, skills in resilience, stress tolerance and flexibility also are highly valued.2

This recognition of the need for new skills training opens up avenues for all types of people, even retirees and middle-aged professionals who would like to change careers. After all, the acquisition of skills based on new technologies means no one will have a huge edge in terms of experience. Therefore, people with the ability to learn technical skills quickly – who already possess high-value soft skills – have strong potential to vie for a new career. If you’re thinking about making such a move, we’d be happy to review your financial portfolio to help make sure you are on the right path toward your retirement.

Another labor trend is the rise of remote work and its impact on employees’ lifestyles. With the pandemic clearing the way for many white-collar workers to work remotely, younger workers have been able to move to more affordable locales and buy their first homes. On the other hand, established homeowners can now consider relocating to wherever they’d like to retire, trading in their current home equity for their retirement home – with a plan to pay off that final mortgage while they’re still working. This way, they can move and start enjoying a retirement lifestyle near the beach, lake or mountains while still gainfully employed, albeit working remotely.3

 Unfortunately, low-skilled, blue-collar professions are on the other side of that coin. Many either lost jobs during the pandemic or were classified as high-risk “essential workers.” Just because grocery store clerks became essential, it doesn’t necessarily mean an increase in pay or benefits. While the debate over raising the national minimum wage continues in Washington, there’s little doubt that many low-paying jobs will always be necessary, but experienced workers in those positions are not necessarily low-skilled.4

For example, what is the value of caregivers who can skillfully attend to mobility-challenged people? Or workers who serve multiple tables of hungry and thirsty patrons who want their meal yesterday? Skills like patience and equanimity have not traditionally received the same level of pay as an office worker, but they are no less valued or necessary. It will be interesting to see, post-pandemic, if these types of jobs begin to translate into fair pay and good benefits.5

 After decades of steady decline, labor unions are hoping for greater respect and participation moving forward – based on support by President Joe Biden’s administration. Today, only one in five households has a union member, and the Economic Policy Institute estimates the decline of unions translates to an average loss of $3,250 per year for a full-time worker. Biden is advocating passage of the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) bill, which would abolish state laws that ban mandatory collection of dues as a condition of employment, penalize businesses that retaliate among union drives and extend federal labor rights to independent contract workers. So far, the House has approved the legislation, but it faces a more difficult path in the Senate.6

1 Kate Whiting. World Economic Forum. Oct. 21, 2020. “These are the top 10 job skills of tomorrow – and how long it takes to learn them.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/10/top-10-work-skills-of-tomorrow-how-long-it-takes-to-learn-them/. Accessed April 30, 2021.

2 Ibid.

3 Liam Dillon. Los Angeles Times. April 30, 2021. “The remote work revolution is transforming, and unsettling, resort areas like Lake Tahoe.” https://www.latimes.com/homeless-housing/story/2021-04-30/covid-wfh-boosts-palm-springs-lake-tahoe-housing-markets. Accessed April 30, 2021.

4 Annie Lowrey. The Atlantic. April 23, 2021. “Low-Skill Workers Aren’t a Problem to Be Fixed.” https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/04/theres-no-such-thing-as-a-low-skill-worker/618674/. Accessed April 30, 2021.

5 Ibid.

6 Steve Matthews and Payne Lubbers. Bloomberg. April 15, 2021. “Biden Confronts Decades of Union Decline in Bid to Boost Pay.” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-04-15/biden-confronts-decades-of-union-decline-in-bid-to-boost-wages?sref=wFA4tJCq. Accessed April 30, 2021.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial or investment advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

 The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions.

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Banking Industry Trends

The prodigious bank ledger used to be one of most important components of America’s financial system. Hand-written entries detailed every account holder’s deposits, withdrawals, loans and payments.

A lot has changed since then. In fact, in just the last decade, banking has become as much a technological innovation as it has a money manager. Even 21st century holdovers like checks and debit cards are gradually being replaced by more immediate transactions. Moving forward, we can expect increased activity in the areas of automation (bill paying, auto saving), personalization (fraud alerts, apps for budget tracking, spend forecasting) and real-time payments (Zelle, Venmo, CashApp).1

If you’re not keeping up with banking trends, now may be a good time to get on board. Not only do “set and forget” functions make it easier to pay bills and save regularly, but these things become even more important when we retire. For example, if you are a “snowbird” with homes in different states, online banking and e-bills can help you stay current without having your mail forwarded. The same is true if you decide to travel extensively. Even abroad, you can pay your bills anywhere that provides a secure Wi-Fi connection. Moreover, today’s banking innovations provide ways to ensure we don’t forget to pay bills or overdraw on our accounts. If you’re looking for other ways to consolidate and simplify your financial activities in retirement, we may be able to help.

If you decide to “retire” your investments and consolidate cash accounts, bear in mind that both the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) insure deposits up to $250,000 per account holder — per each qualified account type — per each insured institution. This means that even if your bank were to fail, the federal government insures that your money is protected.2

After the Great Recession, Congress passed legislation that required banks to hold more capital on reserve for account holders. However, during the pandemic, the Federal Reserve loosened those requirements for lending purposes, allowing a greater cash infusion to help boost the economy. Now that the U.S. is on the road to recovery, the Fed announced in March that it would not extend the relaxed requirements past March 31.3

1 Liz Frazier. Forbes. March 22, 2021. “Digital Banking Trends Evolve In 2021, But Customer Needs Stay The Same.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizfrazierpeck/2021/03/22/digital-banking-trends-evolve-in-2021-but-customer-needs-stay-the-same/?sh=2dc8b9d91cd3. Accessed March 23, 2021.
2 Melissa Lambarena and Chanelle Bessette. NerdWallet. Dec. 7, 2020. “How NCUA Insurance Works.” https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/banking/ncua-insurance-keeps-credit-union-deposits-safe. Accessed April 14, 2021.
3 The Tribune. March 19, 2021. “Fed to end relaxed capital requirements for large banks.” http://www.tribtown.com/2021/03/19/ap-us-federal-reserve-bank-regulation/. Accessed March 23, 2021.
We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.
The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.
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A Shot for Economic Improvement

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the ongoing distribution of vaccines combined with the latest government stimulus is expected to jumpstart economic activity in the U.S. However, projections for sustainable growth are not equitable among various countries and business sectors. Faster and more effective vaccination deployment across the world is critical. The OECD emphasizes that the key to global recovery is widespread inoculation conducted at a faster rate than variant strains of the virus are mutated.

Not only does the unequal vaccination rate restrict productivity worldwide, but the lack of certainty regarding economic recovery will fuel negative consumer and business confidence. Because the rate of infection caused by new variants is competing with the rate of vaccination rollouts, time will decide if and when economic growth and job creation becomes sustainable.1 The U.S. relies heavily on raw materials and manufacturing in other countries, so the continued spread of the virus worldwide affects our own job growth and economic viability, and will continue to restrict global business and consumer travel.

Clearly, spending is key, and households that have reduced activities in the past year likely have the capacity (and pent-up desire) to venture out and spend, travel, dine out and enjoy entertainment venues. Since we’ve all learned how to (inadvertently) tighten the belt throughout the past year, reworking your budget for increased saving and disciplined spending might interest you if your situation allows it. If you’d like some assistance in assessing your retirement income strategy and how insurance products may fit into that strategy, we’re here to help.

One economist observed that delays in the immunization program mean the difference between a quick recovery and long-term labor market “scarring.” In other words, high unemployment could lead to more defaulted loans, bankruptcies and shuttered businesses. This economist projects that if the vaccinated share of the population hits 92% by August, the U.S. should experience 5.2% growth for the year. If vaccinations are at 68%, we can expect about 3% growth for 2021.2

An interesting dilemma that many employers face is whether to require workers to get vaccinated. Not only do unvaccinated workers put each other and customers at higher risk, but by not reaching herd immunity, every company is likely to suffer revenue losses. According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), employers can institute a policy that requires workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, under the following guidelines:3

  • The vaccine must be generally available to the entire employee population.
  • Exceptions can be made for individuals who cannot obtain a vaccine due to a personal health or disability reason.
  • Employees can be excused for a sincerely held religious belief that prohibits the vaccine.
  • Labor union members may object to a mandatory vaccine policy based on provisions in the National Labor Relations Act.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has provided guidelines to help employers encourage inoculating their workforce voluntarily. Recommendations include hosting on-site vaccination opportunities, mobile vaccination clinics and employer-sponsored temporary vaccination clinics.4 

1 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. March 3, 2021. “OECD Economic Outlook. Interim Report March 2021” https://www.oecd.org/economic-outlook/march-2021/. Accessed March 22, 2021.
2 Howard Schneider. Reuters. Jan. 12, 2021. “Jabs equal jobs? Fed sees possible economic boom if vaccine gets on track.” https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-economy-vaccines/jabs-equal-jobs-fed-sees-possible-economic-boom-if-vaccine-gets-on-track-idUSL1N2JJ28N. Accessed March 22, 2021.
3 JD Supra. Feb. 8, 2021. “Employment Issues And The COVID-19 Vaccine.” https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/employment-issues-and-the-covid-19-2739205/. Accessed March 22, 2021.
4 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. March 16, 2021. “Workplace Vaccination Program.” https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/essentialworker/workplace-vaccination-program.html. Accessed March 22, 2021.
We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.
The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.
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Anticipation: What Will You Do?

If you’ve been cooped up, masked and socially distanced for the last year, what’s the first thing you want to do to celebrate post-pandemic freedom? Plan a dinner party? Go on a trip? Hug your grandchild? Do your plans involve spending money – like buying a new car or remodeling your kitchen?

A survey conducted by Groupon in the early days of the pandemic found that people were eager to support community businesses. Two-thirds said that even after the pandemic ended, they were planning to spend $100 a week buying local to help the recovery.¹ Is that something you’re planning now, even in the wake of so many new opportunities to shop online?

For many, the simple pleasure of browsing in a store for nothing in particular is an activity they previously took for granted. Given how long many people have resisted going into stores, there is value in simply thinking about where you’d like to go and what you’d like to buy. Experts say there are positive benefits to the simple act of anticipating – whether it’s buying a new pair of shoes or daydreaming about visiting another country. In fact, those uplifting feelings arise by simply buying tickets to a concert or booking a flight for a vacation.²

Similar feelings of anticipation come with retirement planning. Thinking about what you want your retirement to look like and how you’ll spend your days can be both uplifting and motivating.

Despite the challenges we’ve faced throughout the past year, some folks developed good habits they may want to continue even after things return to normal. For example, reading more books, watching more movies, doing daily workouts, walking and riding bikes with family members.

In fact, here are some interesting pandemic statistics that would be great to continue:3

  • From breakfast through lunch, we are more likely to eat with others
  • Lunch is a bigger deal, generally involving more cooking and less microwaving
  • We are cooking at home more and trying out new recipes
  • Increased eating at home has led to eating more healthily

Another new trend in the travel industry is staying longer at destinations. This has occurred for a couple of reasons. First, while many people have been empowered to work from home, many have decided not to stay at home. Instead, they have traveled to different places where they can blend work with a vacation in places they’ve always wanted to visit. Second, some states and countries require new visitors to quarantine for up to two weeks before they can move about freely in public. Obviously, this means staying in that new locale longer than they may have otherwise. As a result, the CEO of Airbnb reports that monthly rentals have become one of the fastest-growing sectors of its business.4

Even fashion purchases seem to be changing due to the pandemic. Retailers say customers have moved away from trendy items and are buying more classic, timeless apparel. They’ve also shown greater interest in brands that tout inclusive and sustainable products in development, manufacturing and/or by contributing a portion of sales to charitable organizations.5

However, some people aren’t seeking to consume more goods and services once the pandemic is over. In fact, their bucket list has taken a more personal turn. The following are some of the things Americans are looking forward to the most, according to a recent survey by The New York Times:7

  • Sitting in a classroom full of students for the chatter, jokes, laughter and even the background noise]The impromptu camaraderie and guidance of life in the office
  • Shaking hands
  • Going on a date
  • Hugging an elderly family member or someone in a healthcare field who has remained in quarantine when not at work
  • Game night; having friends over for pizza; watching a ballgame together
  • Engaging with people not in their immediate family or social circle
1 Groupon. May 20, 2020. “Groupon Survey: Consumers Optimistic About Post-COVID Recovery.” https://www.groupon.com/merchant/working-with-groupon/groupon-in-the-news/states-reopening-post-covid-optimism-survey-groupon. Accessed March 8, 2021.
2 Kat Lonsdorf. NPR. Feb. 20, 2021. “A Bicycle. A Trip. Or Just Pants: The Things We Buy When Pining For Normal Times.” https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/02/20/968671326/a-bicycle-a-trip-or-just-pants-the-things-we-buy-when-pining-for-normal-times. Accessed March 8, 2021.
3 Pat Melgares. Drovers. Aug. 12, 2020. “How COVID-19 Changed America’s Eating Habits.” https://www.drovers.com/news/how-covid-19-changed-americas-eating-habits. Accessed March 8, 2021.
4 Marketplace. March 8, 2021. “Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky says post-pandemic, cities might actually want the company around.” https://www.marketplace.org/shows/marketplace-tech/airbnb-ceo-brian-chesky-says-post-pandemic-cities-might-actually-want-the-company-around/. Accessed March 8, 2021.
5 Amy de Klerk. Harper’s Bazaar. Feb. 10, 2021. “Are trends no longer in fashion?” https://www.harpersbazaar.com/uk/fashion/a35436082/how-relevant-are-fashion-trends/. Accessed March 8, 2021.
6 Sara Aridi. The New York Times. Jan. 2, 2021. “What’s the First Thing You Will Do When the Pandemic Ends?” https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/02/at-home/post-pandemic-firsts.html. Accessed March 8, 2021.
We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.
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Changing Infrastructure

Would adding more lanes to the nation’s freeways solve our traffic problems? Consider that the Katy Freeway in Houston has 26 lanes at its widest point, and it still bottlenecks during rush hour.1

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and a 2020 presidential candidate, is President Biden’s pick for addressing the nation’s transportation issues. He recently began discussions pertaining to dismantling less effective highway systems while reimagining mass transportation opportunities – all geared toward building systems that help people without cars get to better jobs.2

One of the innovations that has emerged during the COVID crisis is transportation solutions. In large metropolitan areas relying heavily on subway and metro systems, sanitation and social distancing restrictions have limited access and left workers stranded. In its place, cities such as Milan, Paris, Berlin and Budapest have developed cycling and pedestrian infrastructure to make it safer for walking, bicycling and using electric scooters. New innovations include pop-up bike lanes and free bicycle repair stations located along busy boulevards.3

Would Americans ever give up their cars? Probably not. But the current landscape may make it easier to spend less time driving. For example, with opportunities to work remotely, millions of Americans may stay at home and reduce congested commutes. For those wanting to save money, not owning a car for a few years might be a good solution. After all, the savings in gas, insurance and maintenance could yield several thousand a year – money that could be directed toward your goals and overall retirement income solutions. Let us know if you’d like to learn more.

 Mexico City is looking upward rather than at street level to solve its transportation problems. The city recently launched its first cable-car line – similar to the ones you normally see at ski resorts – to  help serve the poorer outskirts of town. The large, indoor, windowed cars holding 10 passengers each are considered easier and quicker to build than highway and below-ground subway systems. Plus, they can cut straight across the city to get people to their destinations much faster.4

 Above ground, but not quite that high, Miami has erected a 25-mile elevated transportation system to all parts of the city, including the airport, and it has free Wi-Fi for riders.5 Similar to the monorail system used in the Disney parks, the Miami metro just finished a 10-mile, 120-acre landscaped park and urban trail that runs underneath the transport system.6 

1 Abigail Rosenthal. Houston Chronicle. Feb. 12, 2021. “It’s not just you: The Katy Freeway is scientifically awful.” https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/It-s-not-just-you-The-Katy-Freeway-is-15945843.php. Accessed March 9, 2021.
2 Sam Mintz. Politico. March 8, 2021. “How Biden is betting on Buttigieg to drive a new era of racial equity.” https://www.politico.com/news/2021/03/08/biden-buttigieg-acial-equity-473928. Accessed March 9, 2021.
3 Michelle Watt and Maya Ben Dror. World Economic Forum. June 19, 2020. “For resilient, sustainable city mobility after COVID-19, these trends must continue.” https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/06/resilient-sustainable-city-mobility-trends-after-covid-19/. Accessed March 9, 2021.
4 Fox News. March 6, 2021. “Mexico City opens cable car line designed to stretch 6 miles, the latest in Latin America.” https://www.foxnews.com/travel/mexico-city-cable-car-line-6-miles-cablebus. Accessed March 9, 2021.
5 Lori Kahn. Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau. March 18, 2021. “All you need to know about Miami metrorail.” https://www.miamiandbeaches.com/plan-your-trip/transportation/all-you-need-to-know-about-miami-metrorail. Accessed March 9, 2021.
6 Jesse Scott. Conde Nast Traveler. Feb. 26, 2021. “Miami’s Coolest New Hangout Spot Is Under the Metrorail Train Tracks.” https://www.cntraveler.com/story/miamis-underline-first-phase-open. Accessed March 9, 2021.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Pandemic Highlights the Difference Between Economics and Finance

One of the more glaring lessons of the 2020 pandemic was that the economy and the stock market are not the same thing, nor do they necessarily move in lockstep. They are measurements of two different things, often indicating how the other will react. However, as we saw last year, the economy is a greater indicator of how Main Street is doing while the stock market is more a reflection of Wall Street.

The day-to-day performance of major stock indices, such as the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average, is not usually an accurate account of what’s happening in the lives of most Americans.1

As a general rule, economics is more of a social science. It conveys a picture that captures the interplay between real resources and human behavior. Finance, on the other hand, is a proactive measure. Its focus is on the tools and techniques of managing money.

We hear these two terms used interchangeably all the time, though, and that’s because they often do move in the same direction. That’s not what happened last year. While millions of Americans lost jobs and other sources of earned income, after an initial drop in the stock market, many investors saw their portfolios make ample gains. This was a good demonstration of how your money in the market could be working as another source of income. It’s another way of diversifying your assets, so that your investments can keeping earning money even if you can’t. Remember, we’re here to help you put your assets to work, so call on us if you need guidance.

Economics covers the production, consumption and distribution of goods and services and how people interact with them — through buying, selling, or working to buy or sell them — and how they react to price changes driven by supply, demand and inflation. It is, after all, people who drive economic activity and ultimately growth. There are two main branches of economics: macroeconomics and microeconomics.2

Macroeconomics measures the overall economy through factors such as inflation, price levels, rate of economic growth, national income, gross domestic product (GDP) and changes in employment levels.3 Microeconomics tracks specific factors within the economy, largely the choices made by people, households and industries. It is a study of the incentives behind those decisions and how they affect the use and distribution of resources.4

Finance, on the other hand, deals specifically with the use and distribution of money. As a discipline, it comprises three basic categories: public finance, corporate finance and personal finance. Within those realms, we often talk about the difference between Main Street and Wall Street. Main Street describes the average American investor as well as small independent businesses, while Wall Street consists of high net worth investors, large global corporations and the high finance capital markets.

There are inevitable conflicts between these two sectors. For example, government regulations frequently are designed to protect individual investors and/or small businesses, but they can pose a detriment to Wall Street profitability. The opposite can also be true, where benefits for large corporations can hurt small businesses, local jobs and small investors.5

Early on, the Federal Reserve and other central banks stepped up to infuse the economy with capital, thus stemming the tide of the economic decline. While these moves helped bolster the stock market, they did not prevent the loss of hundreds of thousands of jobs or stimulate consumerism. In other words, policy and even legislative intervention may have helped Wall Street, but it didn’t do that much to encourage economic growth or job creation.6

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.
1 Clark Merrefield. Journalist Resource. Jan. 11, 2021. “The stock market is not the economy. Right? Here’s what the research says.” https://journalistsresource.org/studies/economics/stock-market-not-economy/. Accessed Feb. 4, 2021.
2 Stephen D. Simpson. Investopedia. Nov. 2, 2020. “Finance vs. Economics: What’s the Difference?” https://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/11/difference-between-finance-and-economics.asp. Accessed Feb. 4, 2021.
3 Investopedia. Dec. 29, 2020. “Macroeconomics.” https://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/macroeconomics.asp. Accessed Feb. 4, 2021.
4 Investopedia. Nov. 2, 2020. “Microeconomics.” https://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/microeconomics.asp. Accessed Feb. 4, 2021.
5 Corporate Finance Institute. 2021. “What is Main Street vs Wall Street?” https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/finance/main-street-vs-wall-street/. Accessed Feb. 4, 2021.
6 Shyam Sunder. Yale Insights. June 17, 2020. “Liquidity Injections May Have Driven the Stock Market Recovery.” https://insights.som.yale.edu/insights/liquidity-injections-may-have-driven-the-stock-market-recovery#gref. Accessed Feb. 15, 2021.
We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial or investment advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.
The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.
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